Article | Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research | Street Protests and Affects on YouTube Investigating DIY Videos of Violent Street Protests as an Archive of Affect and Event Desire

Title:
Street Protests and Affects on YouTube Investigating DIY Videos of Violent Street Protests as an Archive of Affect and Event Desire
Author:
Christoffer Kølvraa: Section for European Studies, School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University, Denmark Carsten Stage: School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University, Denmark
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.1608122
Read article:
Full article (pdf)
Year:
2016
Volume:
8
Issue:
2
Pages:
122-143
No. of pages:
22
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2016-11-08


This article argues that YouTube, as a platform for sharing DIY videos, is an useful resource for understanding the role of affective processes before, during and after protest events. As a case study the article investigates the documentation on YouTube of two antagonistic demonstrations in Aarhus, Denmark, on 31 March 2012. We argue that the collected material, consisting of 71 YouTube videos, can be analysed to reveal a wish or will to experience the demonstrations affectively through three forms of DIY video production: 1) a form where the videos affectively charge the demonstrations before their actualisation; 2) a form where the affective potential of witnessing political violence is actively engaged, sought out, and enjoyed by the video producers during the event; and 3) a form where the affective intensity of the demonstrations is confirmed and prolonged after-the-fact, and the excessive nature of future confrontations implicitly ‘pre-charged’. The videos as such are not only approached as ideological mobilization propaganda or as documentation of political events, but also as an archive capable of revealing the presence and dynamics of the affective dimension of street protest events.

Keywords: YouTube; affect; protest; extremism; English/Danish Defence League

Volume 8, Issue: 2, Article 2, 2016

Author:
Christoffer Kølvraa, Carsten Stage
Title:
Street Protests and Affects on YouTube Investigating DIY Videos of Violent Street Protests as an Archive of Affect and Event Desire:
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.1608122
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Volume 8, Issue: 2, Article 2, 2016

Author:
Christoffer Kølvraa, Carsten Stage
Title:
Street Protests and Affects on YouTube Investigating DIY Videos of Violent Street Protests as an Archive of Affect and Event Desire:
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.1608122
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