Title:
An Historian’s Critique of Sustainability
Author:
Kathleen R. Smythe: Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.146913
Read article:
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Year:
2014
Volume:
6
Theme:
Theme: Sustainabilities Edited by Carina Ren, Tom O’Dell & Adriana Budeanu

Pages:
913-929
No. of pages:
17
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2014-10-01


The most common word-based image of sustainability is a balanced three-way relationship between the environment, society and the economy, sometimes portrayed as a triangle, sometimes as a Venn diagram. The idea is that if you consider all three equally you will have a sustainable outcome. After twenty years of use, however, it has yet to yield a radically different approach to policy, planning or business. The combination of abundant and cheap energy and an emphasis on production has resulted in the separation of economics from both social and biophysical worlds. The long-established practice of isolating the three elements makes re-associating them difficult. Even if it were possible, a more holistic approach to human welfare, both in relation to the natural and social worlds, is likely to bring societies closer to sustainability. The suggestion is that a framework that starts from the premise of providing meaningful work and meaningful lives will support the flourishing of other species as well as the human species.
Keywords: Sustainable development; Brundtland Commission; poverty; energy

Volume 6, Theme:: Theme: Sustainabilities Edited by Carina Ren, Tom O’Dell & Adriana Budeanu

, Article 50, 2014

Author:
Kathleen R. Smythe
Title:
An Historian’s Critique of Sustainability:
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.146913
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
  • Batel Eshko & Alon Eshkol (2018). Emergent planning. URBAN DESIGN International, : . DOI: 10.1057/s41289-018-0054-3
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