Title:
Thingifying Neda: The Construction of Commemorative and Affective Thingifications of Neda Agda Soltan
Author:
Carsten Stage: Department of Aesthetics and Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.113419
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Year:
2011
Volume:
3
Theme:

Independent Articles

Pages:
419-438
No. of pages:
20
Publication type:
Article
Published:
2011-10-25


The article investigates how the participatory creation of global interest in the shooting of Neda Agda Soltan was not only influenced by the online dissemination of texts and images, but also by the construction of things or “image-objects”. By analyzing three specific cases that turn images of Neda into material objects I argue that the cultural role of these “thingifications” is to enable 1) the opening of the present towards a specific historic event, 2) the sharing of affect and 3) the articulation of specific political interpretations of Neda and the Iranian regime. The objects are thus oriented both towards the past by pointing at the importance of the shooting, but also aim to facilitate relationships in the present and future that may use the event to build more just and politically righteous communities.

Keywords: Neda Agda Soltan; Iran; thingification; participatory culture; transposition; image-object; affect

Volume 3, Theme::

Independent Articles

, Article 27, 2011
Author:
Carsten Stage
Title:
Thingifying Neda: The Construction of Commemorative and Affective Thingifications of Neda Agda Soltan:
DOI:
10.3384/cu.2000.1525.113419
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
  • Tarcisio Torres Silva (2015). Body Image as Strategy for Engagement in Social Media. Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, 7(2): 331. DOI: 10.3384/cu.2000.1525.1572331
  • Penelope Papailias (2016). Witnessing in the age of the database: Viral memorials, affective publics, and the assemblage of mourning. Memory Studies, 9(4): 437. DOI: 10.1177/1750698015622058
  • Penelope Papailias (2018). (Un)seeing dead refugee bodies: mourning memes, spectropolitics, and the haunting of Europe. Media, Culture & Society, : 016344371875617. DOI: 10.1177/0163443718756178
  • Mette Mortensen (2017). Constructing, confirming, and contesting icons: the Alan Kurdi imagery appropriated by #humanitywashedashore, Ai Weiwei, and Charlie Hebdo. Media, Culture & Society, 39(8): 1142. DOI: 10.1177/0163443717725572
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